Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10208
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dc.contributor.authorTurpin, Jocelyn-
dc.contributor.authorYurick, David-
dc.contributor.authorKhoury, Georges-
dc.contributor.authorPham, Hai-
dc.contributor.authorLocarnini, Stephen-
dc.contributor.authorMelamed, Anat-
dc.contributor.authorWitkover, Aviva-
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Kim-
dc.contributor.authorPurcell, Damian-
dc.contributor.authorBangham, Charles R M-
dc.contributor.authorEinsiedel, Lloyd-
dc.date2018-
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-25T04:29:00Z-
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-29T00:36:55Z-
dc.date.available2018-10-25T04:29:00Z-
dc.date.available2019-06-29T00:36:55Z-
dc.date.issued2018-10-11-
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal of infectious diseases 2018-10-11-
dc.identifier.urihttp://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10208-
dc.description.abstractThe prevalence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection is high in certain Indigenous Australian populations, but its impact on HTLV-1 has not been described. We compared 2 groups of Indigenous adults infected with HTLV-1, either alone or coinfected with HBV. The 2 groups had a similar HTLV-1 proviral load, but there was a significant increase in clonal expansion of HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes in coinfected asymptomatic individuals. The degree of clonal expansion was correlated with the titer of HBV surface antigen. We conclude that HTLV-1/HBV coinfection may predispose to HTLV-1-associated malignant disease.-
dc.language.isoeng-
dc.titleImpact of Hepatitis B Virus Coinfection on Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Clonality in an Indigenous Population of Central Australia.-
dc.typeJournal Article-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/infdis/jiy546-
dc.identifier.journaltitleThe Journal of infectious diseases-
dc.identifier.pubmedurihttps://www.ezpdhcs.nt.gov.au/login?url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30307560-
dc.identifier.pubmedidhttps://www.ezpdhcs.nt.gov.au/login?url=https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30307560-
dc.identifier.affiliationSection of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom..-
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, Victoria..-
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, Victoria..-
dc.identifier.affiliationBaker Heart and Diabetes Institute Central Australia, Alice Springs Hospital, Northern Territory, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia..-
dc.identifier.affiliationVictorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory, Doherty Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia..-
dc.identifier.affiliationSection of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom..-
dc.identifier.affiliationSection of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom..-
dc.identifier.affiliationNational Serological Reference Laboratory, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia..-
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, Victoria..-
dc.identifier.affiliationSection of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom..-
dc.identifier.affiliationBaker Heart and Diabetes Institute Central Australia, Alice Springs Hospital, Northern Territory, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia..-
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