Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10239
Title: Associations with dental caries experience among a convenience sample of Aboriginal Australian adults.
Authors: Amarasena, N
Kapellas, K
Skilton, M R
Maple-Brown, L J
Brown, A
O'Dea, K
Celermajer, D S
Jamieson, L M
Affiliation: Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health, School of Dentistry, The University of Adelaide, South Australia..
Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health, School of Dentistry, The University of Adelaide, South Australia.. Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory..
Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise and Eating Disorders, The University of Sydney, New South Wales..
Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory.. Division of Medicine, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory..
South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, South Australia..
School of Population Health, The University of South Australia..
Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, New South Wales..
Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health, School of Dentistry, The University of Adelaide, South Australia..
Issue Date: Dec-2015
Citation: Australian dental journal 2015-12; 60(4): 471-8
Abstract: Few studies have examined dental caries experience in Aboriginal adults. The objectives of this study were to describe the dental caries experience of some Aboriginal Australian adults residing in the Northern Territory, and to determine associations with dental caries experience. A convenience sample of Aboriginal adults from Australia's Northern Territory was dentally examined. Self-reported oral health information was collected through a questionnaire. Data were available for 312 participants. The per cent of untreated decayed teeth (per cent DT >0) was 77.9 (95% CI 73.0 to 82.1), the mean DT was 3.0 (95% CI 2.6 to 3.4), the prevalence of any caries experience (the per cent DMFT >0) was 95.5 (95% CI 92.6 to 97.3) and the mean DMFT was 9.7 (95% CI 8.9 to 10.5). In multivariable analyses, unemployment and not brushing teeth the previous day were associated with the per cent DT >0. Problem-based dental attendance was associated with both the mean DT and the per cent DMFT >0. Older age, residing in the capital city, being non-incarcerated, last visiting a dentist <1 year ago and problem-based dental attendance were associated with the mean DMFT. Dental caries experience among this convenience sample of Aboriginal Australian adults was very high. Most factors associated with dental caries were social determinants or dental service access-related.
URI: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10239
DOI: 10.1111/adj.12256
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Aboriginal Australians
caries experience
dental attendance
dental caries
social determinants
Adult
Aged
DMF Index
Dental Care
Dental Caries
Dental Health Services
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Northern Territory
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Oral Health
Prevalence
Surveys and Questionnaires
Toothbrushing
Young Adult
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