Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10292
Title: A population-based study of the association between dysglycaemia and hearing loss in middle age.
Authors: Sommer, J
Brenann-Jones, C G
Eikelboom, R H
Hunter, M
Davis, W A
Atlas, M D
Davis, T M E
Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.. Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, Western Australia, Australia.. Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Subiaco, Western Australia, Australia..
Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, Western Australia, Australia.. Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Subiaco, Western Australia, Australia..
Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, Western Australia, Australia.. Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Subiaco, Western Australia, Australia.. Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa..
Busselton Population Medical Research Institute, Busselton, Western Australia, Australia.. School of Population Health, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Australia..
School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Fremantle Hospital, Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia..
Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, Western Australia, Australia.. Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Subiaco, Western Australia, Australia.. Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia..
School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Fremantle Hospital, Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia..
Issue Date: 2017
Citation: Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association 2017; 34(5): 683-690
Abstract: To investigate the independent associations between hearing loss and dysglycaemia in a sample of middle-aged adults, including separate analysis of those aged < 60 years. The first 2023 participants in the cross-sectional Busselton Health Ageing Survey were assessed for hearing loss ≥ 26 dB (better ear) for four-frequency average (4FA) of pure-tone thresholds at 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 Hz, and high-frequency average (HFA) of pure-tone thresholds at 4000 and 8000 Hz. Valid data from 1864 participants in the Busselton Health Ageing Survey [92.1%; mean ± sd age 56.2 ± 5.5 years, 46.0% men, 120 (7.0%) with diabetes, 274 (14.7%) with prediabetes] were analysed, of whom 103 (5.5%) had four-frequency average hearing loss and 561 (30.1%) had high-frequency average hearing loss. In multivariable analyses, glycaemic status was not independently associated with four-frequency or high-frequency average hearing loss. In the 1286 participants aged < 60 years, there was no relationship between dysglycaemia and high-frequency average hearing loss, but the prevalence of four-frequency average hearing loss increased from 2.3% (95% CI 1.5-3.4) in participants with normoglycaemia to 5.7% (95% CI 3.0-10.6) in those with prediabetes and 10.2% (4.2-21.5) in those with diabetes (trend P = 0.003). In multivariable analysis with normoglycaemia as reference, the odds ratios for four-frequency average hearing loss were 2.84 (95% CI 1.29-6.27) for prediabetes and 5.93 (95% CI 1.67-21.05) for diabetes (P ≤ 0.01) in the < 60 year age group. There was progressively increasing mid-range hearing loss with worsening glucose tolerance in younger individuals, suggesting dysglycaemia-associated early-onset presbycusis.
URI: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10292
DOI: 10.1111/dme.13320
Type: Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Subjects: Age of Onset
Aging
Blood Glucose
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
Female
Glucose Metabolism Disorders
Hearing Loss
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prediabetic State
Presbycusis
Prevalence
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