Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10341
Title: Design, rationale and feasibility of a multidimensional experimental protocol to study early life stress.
Authors: Bartholomeusz, M Dillwyn
Bolton, Philip S
Callister, Robin
Skinner, Virginia
Hodgson, Deborah
Affiliation: School of Psychology, Faculty of Science, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia..
School of Biomedical Sciences & Pharmacy, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia.. Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton Heights, NSW 2305, Australia..
School of Biomedical Sciences & Pharmacy, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia.. Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton Heights, NSW 2305, Australia..
Office of the Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officer, Department of Health, Northern Territory Government, University Fellow Charles Darwin University, PO Box 40596, Casuarina, NT 0811, Australia..
School of Psychology, Faculty of Science, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia.. Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton Heights, NSW 2305, Australia..
Issue Date: Sep-2017
Citation: Contemporary clinical trials communications 2017-09; 7: 33-43
Abstract: There is a rapidly accumulating body of evidence regarding the influential role of early life stress (ELS) upon medical and psychiatric conditions. While self-report instruments, with their intrinsic limitations of recall, remain the primary means of detecting ELS in humans, biological measures are generally limited to a single biological system. This paper describes the design, rationale and feasibility of a study to simultaneously measure neuroendocrine, immune and autonomic nervous system (ANS) responses to psychological and physiological stressors in relation to ELS. Five healthy university students were recruited by advertisement. Exclusion criteria included chronic medical conditions, psychotic disorders, needle phobia, inability to tolerate pain, and those using anti-inflammatory medications. They were clinically interviewed and physiological recordings made over a two-hour period pre, during and post two acute stressors: the cold pressor test and recalling a distressing memory. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and the Parental Bonding Index were utilised to measure ELS. Other psychological measures of mood and personality were also administered. Measurements of heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, skin conductance, skin blood flow and temporal plasma samples were successfully obtained before, during and after acute stress. Participants reported the extensive psychological and multisystem physiological data collection and stress provocations were tolerable. Most (4/5) participants indicated a willingness to return to repeat the protocol, indicating acceptability. Our protocol is viable and safe in young physically healthy adults and allows us to assess simultaneously neuroendocrine, immune and autonomic nervous system responses to stressors in persons assessed for ELS.
URI: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10341
DOI: 10.1016/j.conctc.2017.05.003
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: ANS, Autonomic nervous system
Adverse-childhood-events
CPT, Cold pressor test
CTQ, Childhood Trauma Questionnaire
Childhood-stress
Childhood-trauma questionnaire
DASS, Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale
DS14, Type D Scale
ECG, lectrocardiogram
ELS, Early life stress
EPQRs, Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised – short form
HPA, Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal
PBI, Parental Bonding Instrument
PTSD, Post-traumatic Stress Disorder
Parental-bonding-instrument
RDM, Recall of distressing memory
Type D scale (DS14)
Appears in Collections:NT Health digital library

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