Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10351
Title: Small bowel intestinal permeability in Australian aboriginal children.
Authors: Kukuruzovic, Renata H
Brewster, David R
Affiliation: NT Clinical School, Flinders University and Paediatric Department, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Nothern Territory, Australia..
Issue Date: Aug-2002
Citation: Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition 2002-08; 35(2): 206-12
Abstract: To show that the severity of diarrheal disease in Aboriginal children in tropical Australia is a consequence of underlying small intestinal mucosal damage. A prospective study of 338 Aboriginal admissions compared to 37 non-Aboriginal children, both diarrhea cases and controls. Intestinal permeability was measured by lactulose-rhamnose (L/R) ratios on a timed 90-minute blood test. For diarrheal admissions, significantly more Aboriginal (vs. non-Aboriginal children) had hypokalemia (70 vs. 10%), acidosis (65 vs. 29%), moderate to severe dehydration (52 vs. 19%) and a longer mean length of stay (mean 8.9 vs. 3.9 days). Mean L/R ratios (95% confidence intervals) in Aboriginal children (diarrhea vs. controls) were 16.5 (14.6-18.7) vs. 4.5 (3.8-5.3) compared to 7.7 (4.4-13.3) vs. 2.5 (1.8-3.4), respectively, in non-Aboriginals. Abnormal permeability ratios (> 5.6) consistent with tropical-environmental enteropathy syndrome were found in 36% (27/75) of Aboriginal controls compared to none of the non-Aboriginal controls. On multiple regression, the factors associated with high L/R ratios were diarrheal severity ( < 0.001), acidosis ( = 0.007) and hypokalemia ( = 0.04). An underlying tropical-environmental enteropathy contributes to the severity of acute gastroenteritis in Aboriginal children. Diarrheal complications, such as acidosis, hypokalemia, and osmotic diarrhea are associated with high L/R ratios, reflecting greater small intestinal mucosal damage.
URI: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10351
ISSN: 0277-2116
Type: Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Subjects: Acidosis
Child, Preschool
Dehydration
Diarrhea
Female
Humans
Hypokalemia
Infant
Intestine, Small
Lactulose
Length of Stay
Male
Northern Territory
Permeability
Prospective Studies
Rhamnose
Severity of Illness Index
Intestinal Absorption
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Appears in Collections:NT Health digital library

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