Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10380
Title: Epidemiology of ocular trauma in the Indigenous versus non-Indigenous population in the Top End.
Authors: Kennedy, Morgan S
Robinson, James
Whist, Eline
McCallum, Gabrielle B
Mahendrarajah, Tharmalingam
Affiliation: Royal Darwin Hospital, NT, Australia..
Royal Darwin Hospital, NT, Australia..
Royal Darwin Hospital, NT, Australia..
Menzies School of Health Research, NT, Australia..
Royal Darwin Hospital, NT, Australia..
Issue Date: 26-Oct-2018
Citation: Clinical & experimental ophthalmology 2018-10-26
Abstract: Epidemiological data on visually significant ocular trauma in the Top End of the Northern Territory. Our main objective is to determine whether Indigenous patients are disproportionately affected by visually significant ocular trauma as compared to non-Indigenous patients. This was a retrospective audit at the Royal Darwin Hospital (RDH) in the Top End of the Northern Territory during January 2013 - June 2015. 104 ocular trauma patients were included. 43 were Indigenous and 61 were non-Indigenous METHODS: Medical records of patients with ocular trauma between Jan 2013 - June 2015 (except simple, non-penetrating corneal foreign bodies and abrasions) were reviewed. Vision loss was defined by visual acuity: mild ≥6/18, moderate 6/18- 6/60, severe ≤6/60 following WHO standards. Included the incidence of ocular trauma patients by ethnicity (Indigenous vs non-Indigenous). Our secondary outcome included vision loss, mechanism of injury, open vs closed injury, age, remoteness, and alcohol involvement RESULTS: 104 patient charts reviewed. 43 (41%) were Indigenous and 61 (59% were non-Indigenous). Alleged assault was the greatest contributor to ocular trauma in both groups (74% in Indigenous vs 39% non- Indigenous). Severe vision loss was more prevalent in the Indigenous vs non-Indigenous patients (30% vs 16%). Indigenous patients were disproportionately affected by visually significant ocular trauma compared to non-Indigenous patients. This research provides important data on ocular trauma in the Northern Territory. Further prevention strategies are needed to reduce vision loss in this population.
URI: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10380
DOI: 10.1111/ceo.13429
ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6229-7821
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Aboriginal Australians
Northern Territory
Ocular trauma
Vision impairment
Appears in Collections:NT Health digital library

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