Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10431
Title: Myiasis of the ear: a review with entomological aspects for the otolaryngologist.
Authors: Jervis-Bardy, Joshua
Fitzpatrick, Nick
Masood, Ajmal
Crossland, Graeme
Patel, Hemi
Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia joshua.jervis-bardy@health.sa.gov.au..
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia..
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia..
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia..
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia..
Issue Date: May-2015
Citation: The Annals of otology, rhinology, and laryngology 2015-05; 124(5): 345-50
Abstract: Myiasis is the infestation of live humans (or animals) by fly larvae. Although the diagnosis is relatively straightforward, how to best treat aural myiasis has not been well described in the literature. This comprehensive literature review, therefore, was performed to identify current management principles in aural myiasis, especially with regard to the causative fly family. In addition, we explore the possible relationship between aural myiasis and the highly lethal intracranial myiasis. Literature review using the Medline database (PubMed), Scopus, and Google Scholar. Manuscripts published in the English language between January 1, 1992, and December 31, 2012, were included. Forty-five cases of aural myiasis were reported in 34 manuscripts. Most cases were caused by species of the Sarcophagidae family (n=26/45, 57.8%). The majority of cases (n=40/45, 88.9%) were successfully treated with simple aural toilet and topical treatments alone. No deaths were reported and no cases were seen in conjunction with intracranial myiasis. Aural myiasis is a rare but benign fly infestation of the ear, most commonly by species of the Sarcophagidae family. The overwhelming majority of cases can be successfully managed without the need for surgical intervention.
URI: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10431
DOI: 10.1177/0003489414557021
ISSN: 0003-4894
Type: Journal Article
Review
Subjects: Sarcophagidae
aural myiasis
maggots
otomyiasis
review
treatment
Animals
Ear Auricle
Entomology
Humans
Larva
Diptera
Disease Management
Ear Diseases
Myiasis
Otolaryngology
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