Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10484
Title: Decreased endothelial nitric oxide bioavailability, impaired microvascular function, and increased tissue oxygen consumption in children with falciparum malaria.
Authors: Yeo, Tsin W
Lampah, Daniel A
Kenangalem, Enny
Tjitra, Emiliana
Weinberg, J Brice
Granger, Donald L
Price, Ric N
Anstey, Nicholas M
Affiliation: Global Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research and Charles Darwin University Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University Institute of Infectious Disease and Epidemiology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore..
District Ministry of Health, Menzies School of Health Research-National Institute of Health Research and Development Research Program, Timika..
District Ministry of Health, Menzies School of Health Research-National Institute of Health Research and Development Research Program, Timika..
National Institute of Health Research and Development, Jakarta, Indonesia..
Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Duke University Division of Hematology-Oncology, Durham VA Medical Center, North Carolina..
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, VA Salt Lake Health Care System, Salt Lake City, Utah..
Global Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research and Charles Darwin University Division of Medicine, Royal Darwin Hospital, Australia Centre for Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, Churchill Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom..
Global Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research and Charles Darwin University Division of Medicine, Royal Darwin Hospital, Australia..
Issue Date: 15-Nov-2014
Citation: The Journal of infectious diseases 2014-11-15; 210(10): 1627-32
Abstract: Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, microvascular function, and host oxygen consumption have not been assessed in pediatric malaria. We measured NO-dependent endothelial function by using peripheral artery tonometry to determine the reactive hyperemia index (RHI), and microvascular function and oxygen consumption (VO2) using near infrared resonance spectroscopy in 13 Indonesian children with severe falciparum malaria and 15 with moderately severe falciparum malaria. Compared with 19 controls, children with severe malaria and those with moderately severe malaria had lower RHIs (P = .03); 12% and 8% lower microvascular function, respectively (P = .03); and 29% and 25% higher VO2, respectively. RHIs correlated with microvascular function in all children with malaria (P < .001) and all with severe malaria (P < .001). Children with malaria have decreased endothelial and microvascular function and increased oxygen consumption, likely contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease.
URI: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10484
DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiu308
Type: Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Subjects: Plasmodium falciparum
cerebral malaria
endothelial function
microvascular function
oxygen consumption
severe malaria
tissue hypoxia
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Endothelial Cells
Female
Humans
Malaria, Falciparum
Male
Microvessels
Nitric Oxide
Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared
Oxygen Consumption
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