Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10488
Title: Telemedicine in the Northern Territory: an assessment of patient perceptions in the preoperative anaesthetic clinic.
Authors: Roberts, Simon
Spain, Brian
Hicks, Chelsea
London, James
Tay, Stanley
Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesia, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia..
Department of Anaesthesia, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia..
Department of Anaesthesia, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia..
Department of Anaesthesia, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia..
Department of Anaesthesia, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia..
Issue Date: Jun-2015
Citation: The Australian journal of rural health 2015-06; 23(3): 136-41
Abstract: We investigated patient perceptions of a virtual preoperative anaesthesia evaluation clinic linking Royal Darwin Hospital to Katherine Hospital. Descriptive study, cross-sectional survey. Regional and rural areas of Northern Territory, Australia. Sample includes 27 respondents, five Indigenous, 18 non-Indigenous and four unknown. Introduction of a preoperative anaesthesia evaluation clinic. We designed a 10-item, 5-point Likert scale questionnaire assessing patient perceptions in four domains: (i) technical quality; (ii) perceived efficacy; (iii) affective patient experience; and (iv) patient preference. Qualitative responses are also reported. Twenty-seven out of 35 patients (77%) completed the questionnaire. Ninety-eight per cent were in positive agreement on technical quality with a mean score of 1.35 (SD: 0.53); Ninety-five per cent on perceived efficacy, 1.35 (SD: 0.65); Eighty-four per cent in negative agreement on affective patient experience (negative perception item), 4.19 (SD: 1.07); Eighty-one per cent in negative agreement on patient preference (negative perception item), 4.23 (SD: 1.14). There were no significant differences in the answers between Indigenous (five patients) and non-Indigenous patients (18 patients). Our study confirms the acceptability of telemedicine in the remote assessment of preoperative patients in the Northern Territory, with positive perceptions in all four domains.
URI: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10488
DOI: 10.1111/ajr.12140
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Indigenous health
health service evaluation
preoperative assessment
telemedicine evaluation
video conference
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Northern Territory
Patients
Surveys and Questionnaires
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Anesthetics
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Preoperative Period
Telemedicine
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