Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10737
Title: Hand infection patients presenting to an orthopaedic unit: An audit of incidence and demographics at a rural hospital.
Authors: Turow, Arthur
Palapitige, Bandulasena
Kim, Susan W
Jaarsma, Ruurd L
Bramwell, Donald
Krishnan, Jeganath
Affiliation: Orthopaedics, Flinders Medical Centre, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia..
Orthopaedics, Alice Springs Hospital, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia..
Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia..
Orthopaedics, Flinders Medical Centre, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia..
Orthopaedics, Flinders Medical Centre, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia..
Orthopaedics, Flinders Medical Centre, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia..
Issue Date: Feb-2016
Citation: The Australian journal of rural health 2016-02; 24(1): 48-53
Abstract: Hand infections are a common presentation to health services in the Northern Territory; however, little is known about these patients. This study aims to identify incidence, treatment and co-morbidities of hand infection patients and to pinpoint factors associated with poor outcome. A retrospective study of all patients presenting to Alice Springs Hospital with a hand infection during 2012. Orthopaedic Unit at Alice Springs Hospital. All patients admitted with a hand infection were included. Admission duration, duration waited before first presentation, re-admission rate, duration of re-admission and rate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. One hundred fourteen cases of hand infections were admitted to Alice Springs Hospital during 2012, of which 87 (76%) were in Indigenous patients. Indigenous patients (P = 0.001) and older patients (P = 0.038) had significantly longer admissions. Indigenous patients were 9.52 times (P = 0.038) more likely to be re-admitted than non-Indigenous patients. The rate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was 24.6%, and this was associated with smoking (P = 0.049) and substance abuse (P = 0.036). Formal follow-up was not related to indirect measures of hand infection severity, such as admission duration or re-admissions. Hand infections are a common presentation to Alice Springs Hospital. Indigenous people are admitted 2.38 times longer after adjusting for age and alcohol abuse. They have a more than ninefold chance of being re-admitted to hospital than non-Indigenous people following a hand infection.
URI: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10737
DOI: 10.1111/ajr.12197
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: MRSA
aboriginal health
hand infection
orthopaedics
trauma
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Australia
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hand
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Medical Audit
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Middle Aged
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Retrospective Studies
Staphylococcal Infections
Staphylococcus aureus
Streptococcaceae
Young Adult
Hospitals, Rural
Orthopedics
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