Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10837
Title: Impact of Hepatitis B Virus Coinfection on Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Clonality in an Indigenous Population of Central Australia.
Authors: Turpin, Jocelyn
Yurick, David
Khoury, Georges
Pham, Hai
Locarnini, Stephen
Melamed, Anat
Witkover, Aviva
Wilson, Kim
Purcell, Damian
Bangham, Charles R M
Einsiedel, Lloyd
Affiliation: Section of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom..
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, Victoria..
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, Victoria..
Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute Central Australia, Alice Springs Hospital, Northern Territory, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia..
Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory, Doherty Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia..
Section of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom..
Section of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom..
National Serological Reference Laboratory, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia..
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, Victoria..
Section of Virology, Division of Infectious Diseases, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom..
Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute Central Australia, Alice Springs Hospital, Northern Territory, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia..
Issue Date: 11-Oct-2018
Citation: The Journal of infectious diseases 2018-10-11
Abstract: The prevalence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection is high in certain Indigenous Australian populations, but its impact on HTLV-1 has not been described. We compared 2 groups of Indigenous adults infected with HTLV-1, either alone or coinfected with HBV. The 2 groups had a similar HTLV-1 proviral load, but there was a significant increase in clonal expansion of HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes in coinfected asymptomatic individuals. The degree of clonal expansion was correlated with the titer of HBV surface antigen. We conclude that HTLV-1/HBV coinfection may predispose to HTLV-1-associated malignant disease.
URI: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10837
DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiy546
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:NT Health digital library

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