Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10894
Title: Organ donation after brain death in India: A trained intensivist is the key to success.
Authors: Palaniswamy, Vijayanand
Sadhasivam, Suganya
Selvakumaran, Cibi
Jayabal, Priyadharsan
Ananth, S R
Affiliation: Intensive Care Unit, Royal Darwin Hospital, Tiwi, Darwin 0801, Australia..
Intensive Care Unit, G. Kuppuswamy Naidu Memorial Hospital, Coimbatore, India..
Intensive Care Unit, Kovai Medical Center and Hospital, Coimbatore, India..
Intensive Care Unit, Kovai Medical Center and Hospital, Coimbatore, India..
Intensive Care Unit, SRM Hospital and Research Centre, Kanchipuram, Tamil Nadu, India..
Issue Date: Oct-2016
Citation: Indian journal of critical care medicine : peer-reviewed, official publication of Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine 2016-10; 20(10): 593-596
Abstract: Organ donation after brain death in India is gaining momentum but only in a few states. Tamil Nadu is leading in the country in this regard. Certain cities have performed well compared to Chennai's results. A single tertiary hospital performed 28 donations in a 17 months period with a team of an intensivist and a transplant coordinator. An intensivist needs training and interest in this noble cause. There is no formal training program in this noble cause for doctors in India. A structured formal training needs to be introduced and made mandatory for the doctors in intensive care to make this donation process a successful program.
URI: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/10894
DOI: 10.4103/0972-5229.192049
ISSN: 0972-5229
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: India
intensivist
mandatory training
organ donation
organ sharing
Appears in Collections:NT Health digital library

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