Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/11034
Title: Quantification of Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein-2 in cerebrospinal spinal fluid from cerebral malaria patients.
Authors: Mikita, Kei
Thakur, Kiran
Anstey, Nicholas M
Piera, Kim A
Pardo, Carlos A
Weinberg, J Brice
Mukemba, Jackson
Florence, Salvatore
Mwaikambo, Esther D
Granger, Donald L
Sullivan, David J
Affiliation: W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Global Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research and Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia; Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin Australia; Duke University and Veterans Administration Medical Centers, Durham, North Carolina; Hubert Kairuki Memorial University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; University of Utah School of Medicine and Veterans Administration Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah..
W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Global Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research and Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia; Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin Australia; Duke University and Veterans Administration Medical Centers, Durham, North Carolina; Hubert Kairuki Memorial University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; University of Utah School of Medicine and Veterans Administration Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah..
W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Global Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research and Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia; Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin Australia; Duke University and Veterans Administration Medical Centers, Durham, North Carolina; Hubert Kairuki Memorial University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; University of Utah School of Medicine and Veterans Administration Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah..
W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Global Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research and Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia; Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin Australia; Duke University and Veterans Administration Medical Centers, Durham, North Carolina; Hubert Kairuki Memorial University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; University of Utah School of Medicine and Veterans Administration Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah..
W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Global Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research and Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia; Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin Australia; Duke University and Veterans Administration Medical Centers, Durham, North Carolina; Hubert Kairuki Memorial University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; University of Utah School of Medicine and Veterans Administration Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah..
W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Global Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research and Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia; Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin Australia; Duke University and Veterans Administration Medical Centers, Durham, North Carolina; Hubert Kairuki Memorial University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; University of Utah School of Medicine and Veterans Administration Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah..
W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Global Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research and Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia; Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin Australia; Duke University and Veterans Administration Medical Centers, Durham, North Carolina; Hubert Kairuki Memorial University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; University of Utah School of Medicine and Veterans Administration Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah..
W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Global Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research and Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia; Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin Australia; Duke University and Veterans Administration Medical Centers, Durham, North Carolina; Hubert Kairuki Memorial University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; University of Utah School of Medicine and Veterans Administration Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah..
W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Global Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research and Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia; Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin Australia; Duke University and Veterans Administration Medical Centers, Durham, North Carolina; Hubert Kairuki Memorial University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; University of Utah School of Medicine and Veterans Administration Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah..
W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Global Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research and Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia; Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin Australia; Duke University and Veterans Administration Medical Centers, Durham, North Carolina; Hubert Kairuki Memorial University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; University of Utah School of Medicine and Veterans Administration Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah..
W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Global Health Division, Menzies School of Health Research and Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia; Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin Australia; Duke University and Veterans Administration Medical Centers, Durham, North Carolina; Hubert Kairuki Memorial University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; University of Utah School of Medicine and Veterans Administration Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah dsulliv7@jhmi.edu..
Issue Date: Sep-2014
Citation: The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene 2014-09; 91(3): 486-92
Abstract: A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker for cerebral malaria (CM) has not been validated. We examined the detection, semiquantification, and clinical use of the Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein-2 (PfHRP-2) as a parasite antigen biomarker for CM. The PfHRP-2 was detected in archival CSF samples from CM patients from Tanzania both by a newly developed sensitive and specific immuno-polymerase chain reaction (72 of 73) and by rapid diagnostic tests (62 of 73). The geometric mean PfHRP-2 CSF concentration was 8.76 ng/mL with no differences in those who survived (9.2 ng/mL), those who died (11.1 ng/mL), and those with neurologic sequelae (10.8 ng/mL). All aparasitemic endemic and nonendemic control samples had undetectable CSF PfHRP-2. In a separate group of 11 matched plasma and CSF cerebral malaria patient samples, the ratio of plasma to CSF PfHRP-2 was 175. The CSF PfHRP-2 reflects elevated plasma PfHRP-2 rather than elevated CM-specific CSF ratios, falling short of a validated biomarker.
URI: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/11034
DOI: 10.4269/ajtmh.14-0210
Type: Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Subjects: Antigens, Protozoan
Biomarkers
Child
Child, Preschool
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Infant
Malaria, Cerebral
Male
Plasmodium falciparum
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Protozoan Proteins
Reagent Kits, Diagnostic
Sensitivity and Specificity
Tanzania
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