Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/11035
Title: Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Associated With Work-Place Bullying.
Authors: Malik, Halla
Kangaharan, Nadarajah
Agahari, Ian
Affiliation: Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA, Australia..
Menzies School of Health Research, John Matthews Building (Bldg 58), Royal Darwin Hospital Campus, Australia.. Royal Darwin Hospital, Australia.. Flinders University, Building B4a, Nightingdale Road, Royal Darwin Hospital Campus, Australia..
Royal Darwin Hospital, Australia.. Flinders University, Building B4a, Nightingdale Road, Royal Darwin Hospital Campus, Australia..
Issue Date: 16-Feb-2018
Citation: Occupational medicine (Oxford, England) 2018-02-16; 68(1): 67-69
Abstract: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is a condition of transient left ventricular dysfunction precipitated by acute physical or emotional stress. The pathogenesis of TC is not well understood, but it is known to predominantly affect postmenopausal women in the context of physical or emotional triggers. To describe a case of TC with an association to a never previously described work place stressor of bullying. A 48-year-old female lawyer developed acute chest pain after experiencing significant emotional distress at a workplace meeting. She had experienced 18 months of increasing work-related mental stress in a new managerial role. She was initially thought to have a non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) with widespread T wave inversion on electrocardiogram and elevated serial troponin. However, a diagnosis of TC was subsequently made given the characteristic apical ballooning morphology of the left ventricle found on echocardiogram, normal coronary arteries on angiography and a normal echocardiogram 3 weeks later. This case report describes TC in a younger demographic and a link with workplace bullying. Chronic workplace bullying has the potential for serious physical harm by precipitating Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.
URI: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/11035
DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqx155
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:NT Health digital library

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.