Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/11159
Title: Junior medical officer recruitment: challenges and lessons from the Northern Territory.
Authors: McDonald, Robert
Sathianathan, Vino
Affiliation: Katherine District Hospital, Katherine, Northern Territory, Australia. robjmcdon@yahoo.com.
Issue Date: Jun-2007
Citation: The Australian journal of rural health 2007-06; 15(3): 179-82
Abstract: To examine the influence of newspaper and Internet advertising, word-of-mouth endorsement and student experience in attracting applicants for junior medical officer positions in the Northern Territory. A retrospective study. Fifty-four applicants for junior medical officer positions. Proportion of applicants who reported newspaper advertising, Internet advertising, word of mouth or personal experience in attracting their application for an intern or resident medical officer position. Nineteen per cent of applicants saw the newspaper advertisement and 52% of the Internet advertisement. Eighty-seven per cent of applicants were influenced by word-of-mouth endorsement and 52% by student experience in the Northern Territory or Indigenous health. These results suggest that word-of-mouth endorsement has the greatest influence in attracting applicants for junior medical officer positions in Northern Territory hospitals.
URI: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/11159
DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2006.00791.x
ISSN: 1038-5282
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Advertising as Topic
Career Choice
Communication
Employment
Hospitals, Rural
Humans
Internet
Internship and Residency
Marketing of Health Services
Medically Underserved Area
Newspapers as Topic
Northern Territory
Personnel Selection
Professional Practice Location
Retrospective Studies
Students, Medical
Surveys and Questionnaires
Attitude of Health Personnel
Medical Staff, Hospital
Appears in Collections:NT Health digital library

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