Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/11226
Title: Sulfamethoxazole-Trimethoprim (Cotrimoxazole) for Skin and Soft Tissue Infections Including Impetigo, Cellulitis, and Abscess.
Authors: Bowen, Asha C
Carapetis, Jonathan R
Currie, Bart J
Fowler, Vance
Chambers, Henry F
Tong, Steven Y C
Affiliation: Wesfarmers Centre for Vaccines and Infectious Diseases, Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth.. Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, Western Australia.. Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, North Territory, Australia..
Wesfarmers Centre for Vaccines and Infectious Diseases, Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth.. Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, Western Australia..
Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, North Territory, Australia.. Royal Darwin Hospital, North Territory, Australia..
Duke University Division of Infectious Diseases, Durham, North Carolina..
Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, San Francisco General Hospital, California..
Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, North Territory, Australia.. Victorian Infectious Disease Service, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, and The University of Melbourne, at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Victoria, Australia..
Issue Date: 2017
Citation: Open forum infectious diseases 2017; 4(4): ofx232
Abstract: Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) affect millions of people globally, which represents a significant burden on ambulatory care and hospital settings. The role of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (SXT) in SSTI treatment, particularly when group A Streptococcus (GAS) is involved, is controversial. We conducted a systematic review of clinical trials and observational studies that address the utility of SXT for SSTI treatment, caused by either GAS or Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant (MRSA). We identified 196 studies, and 15 underwent full text review by 2 reviewers. Observational studies, which mainly focused on SSTI due to S aureus, supported the use of SXT when compared with clindamycin or β-lactams. Of 10 randomized controlled trials, 8 demonstrated the efficacy of SXT for SSTI treatment including conditions involving GAS. These findings support SXT use for treatment of impetigo and purulent cellulitis (without an additional β-lactam agent) and abscess and wound infection. For nonpurulent cellulitis, β-lactams remain the treatment of choice.
URI: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/11226
DOI: 10.1093/ofid/ofx232
ISSN: 2328-8957
Type: Journal Article
Review
Subjects: Staphylococcus aureus
group A Streptococcus (GAS)
impetigo
skin and soft tissue infections
sulfamethoxazole- trimethoprim
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