Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/11236
Title: Pathogens penetrating the central nervous system: infection pathways and the cellular and molecular mechanisms of invasion.
Authors: Dando, Samantha J
Mackay-Sim, Alan
Norton, Robert
Currie, Bart J
St John, James A
Ekberg, Jenny A K
Batzloff, Michael
Ulett, Glen C
Beacham, Ifor R
Affiliation: Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia..
Eskitis Institute for Drug Discovery, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia..
Townsville Hospital, Townsville, Queensland, Australia..
Menzies School of Health Research and Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia..
Eskitis Institute for Drug Discovery, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia..
Eskitis Institute for Drug Discovery, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia School of Biomedical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia..
Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia..
School of Medical Science and Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia g.ulett@griffith.edu.au i.beacham@griffith.edu.au..
Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia g.ulett@griffith.edu.au i.beacham@griffith.edu.au..
Issue Date: Oct-2014
Citation: Clinical microbiology reviews 2014-10; 27(4): 691-726
Abstract: The brain is well protected against microbial invasion by cellular barriers, such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). In addition, cells within the central nervous system (CNS) are capable of producing an immune response against invading pathogens. Nonetheless, a range of pathogenic microbes make their way to the CNS, and the resulting infections can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Bacteria, amoebae, fungi, and viruses are capable of CNS invasion, with the latter using axonal transport as a common route of infection. In this review, we compare the mechanisms by which bacterial pathogens reach the CNS and infect the brain. In particular, we focus on recent data regarding mechanisms of bacterial translocation from the nasal mucosa to the brain, which represents a little explored pathway of bacterial invasion but has been proposed as being particularly important in explaining how infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei can result in melioidosis encephalomyelitis.
URI: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/11236
DOI: 10.1128/CMR.00118-13
Type: Journal Article
Review
Subjects: Animals
Blood-Brain Barrier
Central Nervous System Infections
Humans
Immunologic Surveillance
Nasal Cavity
Olfactory Nerve
Trigeminal Nerve
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