Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/11250
Title: Hospitalisation in Children with Adrenal Insufficiency and Hypopituitarism: Is There a Differential Burden between Boys and Girls and between Age Groups?
Authors: Rushworth, R Louise
Chrisp, Georgina L
Dean, Benjamin
Falhammar, Henrik
Torpy, David J
Affiliation: School of Medicine, Sydney, The University of Notre Dame, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia..
School of Medicine, Sydney, The University of Notre Dame, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia..
School of Medicine, Sydney, The University of Notre Dame, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia..
Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.. Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.. Menzies School of Health Research and Royal Darwin Hospital, Tiwi, Northwest Territories, Australia..
Endocrine and Metabolic Unit, Royal Adelaide Hospital and University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia..
Issue Date: 2017
Citation: Hormone research in paediatrics 2017; 88(5): 339-346
Abstract: To determine the burden of hospitalisation in children with adrenal insufficiency (AI)/hypopituitarism in Australia. A retrospective study of Australian hospitalisation data. All admissions between 2001 and 2014 for patients aged 0-19 years with a principal diagnosis of AI/hypopituitarism were included. Denominator populations were extracted from national statistics datasets. There were 3,779 admissions for treatment of AI/hypopituitarism in patients aged 0-19 years, corresponding to an average admission rate of 48.7 admissions/million/year. There were 470 (12.4%) admissions for an adrenal crisis (AC). Overall, admission for AI/hypopituitarism was comparable between the sexes. Admission rates for all AI, hypopituitarism, congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), and "other and unspecified causes" of AI were highest among infants and decreased with age. Admissions for primary AI increased with age in both sexes. Males had significantly higher rates of admission for hypopituitarism. AC rates differed by both sex and age group. This nationwide study of the epidemiology of hospital admissions for a principal diagnosis of AI/hypopituitarism shows that admissions generally decreased with age; males had higher rates of admission for hypopituitarism; females had higher rates of admission for CAH and "other and unspecified causes" of AI; and AC incidence varied by age and sex. Increased awareness of AI and AC prevention strategies may reduce some of these admissions.
URI: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/11250
DOI: 10.1159/000479370
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Adrenal crisis
Adrenal insufficiency
Congenital adrenal hyperplasia
Hospital admission
Hypopituitarism
Primary adrenal insufficiency
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