Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/11264
Title: Ten years of trauma in the 'top end' of the Northern Territory, Australia: a retrospective analysis.
Authors: Gowing, Christopher J
McDermott, Kathleen M
Ward, Linda M
Martin, Bronte L
Affiliation: National Critical Care and Trauma Response Centre, Royal Darwin Hospital, PO Box 41326, Casuarina, NT 0811, Australia. Electronic address: christopher.gowing@nt.gov.au..
National Critical Care and Trauma Response Centre, Royal Darwin Hospital, PO Box 41326, Casuarina, NT 0811, Australia..
Menzies School of Health Research, PO Box 41096, Casuarina, NT 0811, Australia..
National Critical Care and Trauma Response Centre, Royal Darwin Hospital, PO Box 41326, Casuarina, NT 0811, Australia..
Issue Date: Jan-2015
Citation: International emergency nursing 2015-01; 23(1): 17-21
Abstract: To examine characteristics of traumatic injury in adults and children at the Royal Darwin Hospital (RDH) over a 10 year period. A retrospective review of the RDH Trauma Registry data from 1 January 2003 to 31 December 2012, with analysis of patient demographics, mechanism of injury, Injury Severity Score (ISS), and outcome. Two thousand seven hundred twenty-five patients with an ISS greater than or equal to 9 and met all other study inclusion criteria. Motor vehicle crashes, assaults and falls consistently remained the three most common mechanisms of injury throughout the 10 year period. Indigenous admissions showed a significant downward trend (p = 0.009). Upward trends were noted in presentations from patients aged greater than 44 (p = 0.002), all-terrain vehicle accidents (p <0.001), and hangings (p = 0.003). No other trends were noted to significant at a p <0.05 level. Admitted Indigenous patients were significantly more likely to be present due to assault (p <0.001) and female patients were more likely to present due to assault, falls and motor vehicle crashes (p <0.01) than their counterparts. Presentations for traumatic injury to Royal Darwin Hospital have remained in the most part, consistently stable for the period of 2003-2012. Though there were some increases/decreases in regard to specific demographics and mechanisms, few were found to be statistically significant at a p < 0.05 level.
URI: http://docs.prosentient.com.au/prosentientjspui/handle/1/11264
DOI: 10.1016/j.ienj.2014.09.006
Type: Historical Article
Journal Article
Subjects: Australia
ISS
Indigenous
Mechanism of injury
Northern Territory
Royal Darwin Hospital
Top end
Trauma
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
History, 21st Century
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Injury Severity Score
Male
Middle Aged
Northern Territory
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Trauma Centers
Wounds and Injuries
Young Adult
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